POST 10: TIME OUT!

Welcome back! Before I go any further, I thought this would be a good time to recap some of the most important points we’ve discussed, so far. So here we go …

  • First of all, we described how there was no such thing as a: “gay”, “bi” or “straight” person because the existence of such persons is scientifically implausible. Additionally, “homosexuality” at best, offers no evolutional benefit to life while at worst, reduces the quality of life, due to a significantly increased risk of tissue injury and cancer. Thus, there must be a more logical way of understanding sexuality.
  • Understanding sexuality, at the ultimate level, depends on acknowledging the fundamental purpose of sexual arousal, i.e. reproduction. This means all counts of sexual arousal are due to instinct either recognizing or anticipating an opportunity to reproduce – even if the conscious mind doesn’t recognize what instinct perceives to recognize.
  • Erections due to instinct recognizing an obvious opportunity to procreate are described as opportunistic erections while erections due to instinct anticipating an opportunity to procreate are described as proactive erections.
  • The instinctual recognition of a sexual competitor may lead to a proactive erection. Such erections, therefore, are motivated by the instinctual drive to promote a superior libido so as to trump sexual competitors, in attracting mates [for reproduction].
    • In humans, today, such competitively induced proactive erections are obsolete, mainly due to:
      1. humans concealing their genitals with clothing
      2. permanent breast development, in women, obscuring womanly breast swelling due to sexual arousal
      3. the personal and intellectual demand for auxiliary traits in potential sexual partners, such as: charm, charisma, wealth, social status, etc.

As you can see, this short-sharp summary explains a lot without contradicting such well accepted concepts, like heredity. There is, of course, a lot more to discuss. For now, however, I just wanted to focus a little more on what causes some people to experience competitively induced proactive erections.

-Anxiety – the true trigger of competitively induced proactive erections
As the sub-heading suggests, anxiety really is the underlying cause of proactive erections pertaining to the instinctual recognition of sexual competition. Of course, the term anxiety, itself, is rather general, so to be more specific, the kind of anxiety we are really talking about here is the kind that comes from a severely negative self-image. What this means is that a person who experiences proactive erections due to sensing another person [or people] of the same gender, does so because deep down, they think they are not good enough for the opposite gender, when compared to people of their own gender. In other words, if you think, deep down, that you are relatively unattractive to the opposite gender then chances are you will experience sexual arousal when confronted with people of your own gender. Please note, that when I say “gender” I mean whether you are physically [born] male or female.

For those of you wondering how this can be the case, remember what I explained in my previous posts – particularly the ones with the comics. Your instinct is always trying to search for and attract the opposite gender so that you can reproduce. If your instinct “thinks” you are handicapped when juxtaposed with your local sexual competitors (i.e. people of your own gender) then your instinct tries to overcompensate your apparent deficiencies by advertising a robust libido, to the world around you [see Figure 10.1]. In this way, you could more easily attract sex seeking members of the opposite gender, who would be primarily interested in a functional libido – because without a working libido, no sex would be possible. Let us not forget, of course, that this instinctual attempt to keep you looking sexually appealing, is now obsolete (in people) due to the natural evolution of humanity.

Figure 10.1: The instinct of the man on the left tries to overcompensate for its relatively inferior physique by showing off a more vibrant libido. This, in primeval times, would have served to attract nearby women, who would have otherwise found the physically superior male [on the right] more attractive.

Figure 10.1: The instinct of the man on the left tries to overcompensate for its relatively inferior physique by showing off a more vibrant libido. This, in primeval times, would have served to attract nearby women, who would have otherwise found the physically superior male [on the right] more attractive.

I know that for some of you, believing my claims will not be possible without proof – that’s a good thing. Proof is always important with any claim and I have plenty of proof to back the claims I have made here, regarding a negative self-image and its impact on sexual arousal. In fact, most people [I suppose] already know the proofs of my claim and will realize this when they remember that:

  1.  many members of the so called LGBTQ community suffer from anorexia and/or bulimia, which are both strong indicators of a negative self-image [except, of course, when anorexia is due to poverty, disease or some other weight reducing agent]
  2. “lesbianism” for many women, first appears at about the age of 30 years – roughly the age when skin starts to lose its elasticity and wrinkles begin to appear. This is, no doubt, disastrous for many women, especially today – given the emphasis modern media places on maintaining a youthful image
  3. the apparent rise in the number of people identifying themselves as “homosexual,” particularly among teens. This coincides with a rise in direct and indirect marketing towards having the “ideal” body. Obviously, our media today, with its full cast of busty, leggy, curvy and shiny women along with its hunky, chiseled men, has a very negative impact on some of society’s most impressionable members.
Photograph 10.1: Recognizing that you may look too different to what the media suggests is beautiful can often lead to a negative self-image and anxiety.

Photograph 10.1: Perceiving that you may look too different to what the media suggests is beautiful can often lead to a negative self-image and anxiety.

I can go on but I don’t see a need to because I’m sure many of you can already think of other things that prove the essential link between a poor self-image and what many call “same sex attraction” or SSA, for short. Remember, it’s not same sex attraction (or SSA) because such a concept is not scientifically plausible. Instead, a more appropriate term would be “proactive erection syndrome” or PES, for short. So the next time you hear somebody using “SSA” to explain sexuality, feel free to enlighten them by introducing them to PES – a more logical and scientifically plausible understanding of sexuality [see Figure 10.2].

Figure 10.2: A new slogan to help combat the ill-conceived concept of same sex attraction.

Figure 10.2: A new slogan to help combat the ill-conceived concept of same sex attraction.

Alright everybody, that’s enough for one day. Next time, I plan on going deeper into proactive erections so as to bring to light a more thorough model of sexuality. Till then, all the best.

Bibliography:
T.G. Sandfort, R. de Graaf, R.V. Bijl, & P. Schnabel, ‘Same-sex sexual behavior and psychiatric disorders: findings from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS)’, Archives of General Psychiatry, vol. 58, 2001, pp. 85-91.

H.M. Bos, T.G. Sandfort, E.H. de Bruyn, E.M. Hakvoort, ‘Same-sex attraction, social relationships, psychosocial functioning, and school performance in early adolescence.’, Developmental Psychology, vol. 44(1), Jan 2008, pp. 59-68.

D. M. Fergusson, ‘Sexual orientation of and mental health in a birth cohort of young adults.’, Psychological Medicine, vol. 35, 2005, pp. 971-981.

S. Cochran, V. Mays, M. Alegria, A. N. Ortega, D. Takeuchi, ‘Mental health and substance use disorders among Latino and Asian American lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults.’, Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 75(5), October 2007, pp. 785-794.

C. S. Moran, ‘Mid-Life Sexuality Transitions in Women – a Queer Qualitative Study’, southernct.edu, 2008, Internet, https://www.southernct.edu/womensstudies/uploads/textWidget/wysiwyg/documents/WomensSexualityThesis.pdf, (27 July 2013).

L.M. Diamond, Sexual Fluidity: Understanding Women’s Love and Desire, Harvard University Press, U.S.A., 2008, pp. 137-170.

D. J. Carlat, C. A. Camargo, D. B. Herzog, ‘Eating Disorders in Males: A Report on 135 Patients’, Internet, http://www.hawaii.edu/hivandaids/Obsessive-_Eating_Disorders_in_Males__A_Report_on_135_Patients.pdf, (27 July 2013).

M. B. Feldman, I. H. Meyer, ‘Eating Disorders in Diverse Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Populations’, Int J Eat Disord, vol. 40(3), April 2007, pp. 218-226.