POST 3: HOMOSEXUALITY VERSUS HEALTH

Welcome back! In my last post, I briefly discussed how “homosexuality” offered no apparent
advantage to life – as we know it. So, for the sake of completion, I thought it would be worth discussing the known negatives that come with being “gay.” Before I continue, however, I just want to clarify that the term “gay”, as used in my last sentence, is very misleading because what I am about to discuss actually applies to everyone – regardless of the orientation one may consider themselves to be. Let me explain, society typically appears to describe “gay sex” as being either “oral sex” or “anal sex.” Both of these activities, however, can and are also performed by “heterosexual” couples. So really, the following health risks apply to anyone who engages in oral or anal sex – regardless of any perceived sexual orientations.

Note: the following are presented from a purely natural perspective. By that I mean I have purposely kept the use of condoms out of the question so as to keep everything as “natural” as possible.

-The Dangers of Fellatio, Cunnilingus and Anilingus (i.e. Oral Sex)
Many people, particularly adolescents, seem to think oral sex is always a safer alternative to penis-vagina sex (i.e. coitus) – especially when it comes to preventing unwanted pregnancies. Recent scientific research, however, has found that oral sex significantly increases a person’s chances of contracting sexually transmitted diseases/illnesses (STD’s/STI’s) and oral cancers, such as throat cancer. In the worst cases, such cancers have caused permanent mouth disfigurement in patients together with a constant need for medicine to minimize both pain and the risk of further infection. Syphilis is also typically found in such patients because of its ability to be passed on orally. Such patients end up having a shortened and reduced quality of life.

Photograph 3.1: Oral sex is risky to all who engage in it, regardless of sexual orientation.

This, as far as I’m concerned, definitely does not look like a safer alternative to coitus (penis-vagina sex) but rather, the exact opposite. Oral sex, therefore, does not advantage life in any way but it can certainly disadvantage it.

-The Dangers of Sodomy (i.e. Anal Sex)
Given oral sex is a dangerous choice for sex, is there any bad news for [penetrating] “spooners?” Unfortunately, yes! Anal sex (or sodomy) is just as bad, if not worse than oral sex because it too, increases the risks of contracting cancers – but of the anal type. Besides that, the immediate danger of being penetrated from the anus is the risk of incurring an anal fissure. That is, when the anal passage rips because of the penis (or other object) being inserted into it. These fissures often are extremely painful and typically require a medical doctor to: inspect, clean and then perform some stitching just to stop the bleeding. Additionally, such bodily damage can make it very painful to sit down – as if the patient was suffering from hemorrhoids. Anal fissures, to add to the discomfort, are especially risky because of the high chance of infection they pose to the patient. Anal sex, like oral sex therefore, disadvantages life by causing bodily damage and increasing the risk of infection and cancer.

Photograph 3.2: Anal sex, whether homosexual or not, can lead to physical damage of the anus, which may complicate to an infection and/or cancer.

-My Perspective
Okay, clearly the mouth and butt were not created to be penetrated by the penis or similar. There’s just too many serious short-term and long-term health risks associated with oral and anal sex, which are typically not found with coitus.

For my next post, I plan on questioning the questions that society asks to define its members. From that step, we will finally be able to build a whole new understanding of sexuality, which supersedes society’s current understanding. I look forward to seeing you then.

Bibliography:
G. D’Souza, A.R. Kreimer, R. Viscidi, M. Pawlita, C. Fakhry, W.M. Koch, W.H. Westra, M.L. Gillison, ‘Case – Control Study of Human Papillomavirus and Oropharyngeal Cancer’, The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 356(19), May 2007, pp. 1944-1956.

G. D’Souza, Y. Agrawal, J. Halpern, S. Bodison, M.L. Gillison, ‘Oral Sexual Behaviors Associated with Prevalent Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection’, The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 199(9), May 2009, pp. 1263-1269.

P.V. Chin-Hong, E. Vittinghoff, R.D. Cranston, L. Browne, S. Buchbinder, G. Colfax, M. Da Costa, T. Darragh, D.J. Benet, F. Judson, B. Koblin, K.H. Mayer, J.M. Palefsky, ‘Age-Related Prevalence of Anal Cancer Precursors in Homosexual Men: The EXPLORE Study’, Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 97(12), June 2005, pp. 896-905.

‘Anal Cancer’ in American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons, 2008, Internet,
http://www.fascrs.org/patients/conditions/anal_cancer/

‘Oral sex can cause throat cancer’ in New Scientist, 2007, Internet,
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn11819-oral-sex-can-cause-throat-cancer.html#.UiRT1VLzanA